Fresh Growth

Barn Owl Bakery: Growing Heritage Grains

February 05, 2021 Co-hosts Stacie Clary and Steve Elliott with guest Nathan Hodges Season 2 Episode 6
Fresh Growth
Barn Owl Bakery: Growing Heritage Grains
Chapters
Fresh Growth
Barn Owl Bakery: Growing Heritage Grains
Feb 05, 2021 Season 2 Episode 6
Co-hosts Stacie Clary and Steve Elliott with guest Nathan Hodges

Today’s guest is Nathan Hodges, who along with his wife Sage Dilts, runs Barn Owl Bakery on Lopez Island, Washington. He discusses why they are farming and sourcing heritage grains and using them in their baked goods; how the grains are processed locally; how the community plays a big role in their success; the results of his Western SARE research project; and what “right livelihood” means to them.

The bakery came first, and then the growing of the grains. Nathan searches for grains that grow well in his climate and soils, taste good, and are highly nutritious.

 After learning about heirloom grains and doing their own research finding seed and growing them, “we fell in love with these old grains...  and developed a relationship with the grains,  appreciating what the old grains bring to our bakery and our farming."

Heritage grains grow tall, and their root system mirrors this. Having grain with deep roots to access soil moisture is an advantage in their climate.

Learn more at western.sare.org.

Show Notes

Today’s guest is Nathan Hodges, who along with his wife Sage Dilts, runs Barn Owl Bakery on Lopez Island, Washington. He discusses why they are farming and sourcing heritage grains and using them in their baked goods; how the grains are processed locally; how the community plays a big role in their success; the results of his Western SARE research project; and what “right livelihood” means to them.

The bakery came first, and then the growing of the grains. Nathan searches for grains that grow well in his climate and soils, taste good, and are highly nutritious.

 After learning about heirloom grains and doing their own research finding seed and growing them, “we fell in love with these old grains...  and developed a relationship with the grains,  appreciating what the old grains bring to our bakery and our farming."

Heritage grains grow tall, and their root system mirrors this. Having grain with deep roots to access soil moisture is an advantage in their climate.

Learn more at western.sare.org.